Scott Wollschleger: Soft Aberration

, composer

About

Described as “evocative” and “kaleidoscopic” (The New York Times), composer Scott Wollschleger’s music is at times deconstructive, disembodied, and dystopic, anchored by his penchant for arresting instrumental colors. This remarkable recording features performances by soprano Corrine Byrne, trumpeter Andy Kozar, violist Anne Lanzilotti, cellist John Popham, pianist Karl Larson, Mivos Quartet, and Longleash trio. 

Audio

# Audio Title/Composer(s) Performer(s) Time
Total Time 67:18
01
Brontal Symmetry
Longleash: Pala Garcia, violin John Popham, cello Renate Rohlfing, piano14:27
02
Soft Aberration
Anne Lanzilotti, viola, Karl Larson, piano13:32
03
Bring Something Incomprehensible into this World - Part I
Andy Kozar, trumpet, Corrine Byrne, soprano6:41
04
America
John Popham, cello8:00
05
Bring Something Incomprehensible into this World - Part II
Andy Kozar, trumpet, Corrine Byrne, soprano3:27

String Quartet no.2 “White Wall”

Mivos String Quartet: Olivia de Prato, Josh Modney, Violins, Victor Lowrie, viola, Mariel Roberts, cello
06
Part I
Mivos String Quartet: Olivia de Prato, Josh Modney, Violins, Victor Lowrie, viola, Mariel Roberts, cello11:57
07
Part II
Mivos String Quartet: Olivia de Prato, Josh Modney, Violins, Victor Lowrie, viola, Mariel Roberts, cello7:31
08
Bring Something Incomprehensible into this World - Part III
Andy Kozar, trumpet, Corrine Byrne, soprano1:43

Described as “evocative” and “kaleidoscopic” (The New York Times), composer Scott Wollschleger’s music is at times deconstructive, disembodied, and dystopic, anchored by his penchant for arresting instrumental colors. Wollschleger probes timbre, instrumental relationships, and aesthetic implications to find transcendent moments in unique textures. Brontal Symmetry, the opening work written for the Longleash piano trio, is a sort of a puzzle. The work is comprised of a series of “discarded scraps” from other pieces, and Wollschleger introduces them, jumpcuts to other material, and comes back, playing a kind of memory game with the listener. The music itself careens between cartoonish, macabre, and mechanical — one could almost imagine it as the soundtrack to an avant-garde film noire. Soft Aberration, written for pianist Karl Larson and violist Anne Lanzilotti (who also produced the recording), is Feldmanesque in its temporal suspension, with exploratory phrases that are repeated with variation and framed with poignant silences. Wollschleger writes that the piano and viola parts project a “broken echo” of each other, striving to see in the other some mirror of their own material. The viola part employs white noise frequently, as if reaching for the shadow of full voiced music from a time before the piece began. He observes that this “broken echo” relationship imitates life, in which we are always trying to understand and communicate seamlessly with people with whom we are close, but “always missing each other a little bit.”

The solo cello work, America, written for John Popham, returns to the glitchy, machine-like repetition of Brontal Symmetry, mixing a panoply of extended techniques together in a schizophrenic meditation. White Wall, written for the Mivos Quartet, focuses on white noise techniques on bowed string instruments, similar to what was heard momentarily in Soft Aberration, as a foundation from which fragile harmonics and fleeting melodic fragments emerge. White noise is the starting point for the work, but for Wollschleger it also represents an aesthetic ending point, as a manifestation of “complete emptiness” or “the bleached out remains of something.” As Part 1 evolves, we hear more continuity to the fragile pitched lines and eventually they grow into a otherworldly dance, always refracted through a distorting prism. This too disintegrates as Part 2 draws to a close, ultimately returning to white noise, the ground for the entire work. Bring Something Incomprehensible into This World, written in 2015 for soprano Corrine Byrne and trumpeter Andy Kozar, is heard here in three parts, though it was originally in one continuous whole. Wollschleger explores the dynamics of duo writing and their invariable manifestation as some form of dialogue. In Part 1, the text is broken into fragments of single words and syllables, with the trumpet writing matching this deconstruction with disjointed cells of intervallic leaps, air sounds, wah-wah mute calls, and short scalar bursts. The occasional synchronicity of voice and trumpet timbres, what Wollscheger terms a “dirty unison,” creates a quasi “mutant offspring” hybrid instrument between the two. Part 2 explores more sustained pitches in the voice, with the trumpet playing flutter tongue ascending lines inside her sound. In Part 3, the vocalizing extends to the trumpet part for a whispering duet before the soprano closes this remarkable recording with two haunting descending minor sevenths, perhaps in a rhetorical question, or an oblique assertion, as we contemplate the present and the future: “this….world.”

All music composed by Scott Wollschleger, poublished by Project Schott New York (BMI).
The music on track 2 is published under the title Soft Aberration no. 2.
Tracks 3, 5, and 8 are published as a single continuous composition without movement breaks. Trackks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 were recorded between October 2014 - November 2016 at Oktaven Audio, Yonkers, NY. 
Tracks 6 and 7 were recorded May 12 at Sear Sound, New York, NY.
Recording engineer: Ryan Streber
Editing, Mixing, and Mastering: Ryan Streber, Hans Hsu, Anne Lanzilotti, and Scott Wollschleger
Produced by: Anne Lanzilotti, Scott Wollschleger
Executive Producer: Anne Lanzilotti
Album Design: Traci Larson
Painting: May I have this dense, by Lisa Abbot-Canfield, used with permission from the artist
Photography: Anne Lanzilotti, used with permission
This album was made possible with support from the Alice M. Ditson Fund

Scott Wollschleger

Scott Wollschleger (b.1980, Erie, PA) is a Brooklyn-based composer of solo, chamber, and dramatic music. His distinct musical language explores themes of art in dystopia, the conceptualization of silence, synesthesia, and creative repetition in form. Wollschleger’s music has been described as “evocative” and “kaleidoscopic” (The New York Times) and Alex Ross recently noted that Wollschleger “has become a formidable, individual presence” (The Rest Is Noise). Much of his music features a sense of “timeless lyricism”, a quality that influential avant-garde jazz pianist and blogger Ethan Iverson described as “the highlight of the disc” in his enthusiastic review of Wollschleger’s Brontal No. 3 on Red Light New Music’s debut album Barbary Coast, a 2014 New Focus Recordings release. Wollschleger’s concert works have been performed across the US and the world, including the International Music Institute at Darmstadt, the Festival of New American Music in Sacramento, the Bang on a Can Festival at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, and the MATA Festival Interval Series. Following lightly in the footsteps of the New York School, Wollschleger received his Masters of Music in composition from Manhattan School of Music. Wollschleger’s music has been supported by grants and awards from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Yvar Mikhasho Trust for New Music, BMI, New Music USA, and the Society for New Music. His music is published by Project Schott New York.

Longleash

Longleash (Pala Garcia, violin; John Popham, cello; Renate Rohlfing, piano) is a group with a traditional instrumentation and a progressive identity. Inspired by music with unusual sonic beauty, an inventive streak, and a compelling cultural voice, Longleash extends a love of classical chamber musicianship to the interpretation of contemporary music, crafting performances that are both dynamic and thoughtfully refined. An “expert young trio” praised for its “subtle and meticulous musicianship” (Strad Magazine) and its "technical expertise and expressive innovation" (Feast of Music), Longleash has quickly earned a reputation in the US and abroad for innovative programming, artistic excellence, and new music advocacy. Longleash takes its name from Operation Long Leash, a CIA program designed to covertly support and disseminate the work of American avant-garde artists throughout Europe during the Cold War.

The trio balances a full performing schedule with commissioning and recording projects alongside their proprietary summer concert series and composition workshop, The Loretto Project (KY). Performance highlights include concerts at Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC), the Ecstatic Music Festival (NY), the Green Music Center (CA), National Sawdust (NY), Scandinavia House (NY), Trondheim International Chamber Music Festival (Norway), and the University of Louisville. Longleash has conducted lectures and workshops at New York University, Manhattan School of Music, University of Nebraska, Ohio University, and Hunter College. The trio's work on behalf of American composers has been recognized and supported by Chamber Music America, the Alice K. Ditson Fund of Columbia University, and the Aaron Copland Fund for Music.

Anne Lanzilotti

A fierce advocate of contemporary music, Anne Lanzilotti has distinguished herself premiering works by and collaborating with composers of her generation. An active composer-performer, Lanzilotti has been a guest artist with Alarm Will Sound, Ensemble Échappé, and the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE). Lanzilotti teaches at University of Northern Colorado School of Music. As a scholar, she specializes in the music of Andrew Norman: her dissertation is an analysis of Norman’s The Companion Guide to Rome, showing the influence of architecture and visual art on the work. As an extension of that research, she created Shaken Not Stuttered, a free online resource that demonstrates extended techniques for strings used in Norman’s orchestral and chamber works. Lanzilotti has also published articles in Music & Literature and Neue Zeitschrift für Musik. A native of Hawai‘i, she is a co-founder and Artistic Consultant for Kalikolehua — El Sistema Hawai‘i, a free orchestra program for underserved youth.

Karl Larson

Brooklyn based pianist Karl Larson, praised for his “thoughtful” and “fervent” performances by The New York Times, is a sought after musician dedicated to the performance and cultivation of contemporary music. Larson has premiered works by notable composers including David Lang, Chris Cerrone, Scott Wollschleger, and David Rakowski. Larson has worked with many notable musicians and ensembles in his field and continues to seek out new collaborations and innovative projects. Recent collaborations include his work with Bearthoven, whose debut record Trios was released on Cantaloupe Music in May 2017, and Ashley Bathgate, with whom he released Restless, a record of Ken Thomson’s compositions, in October 2016. Larson is originally from McFarland, WI, and he holds degrees from Luther College and Bowling Green State University, where his primary teachers were John Strauss and Laura Melton.

Andy Kozar

A native of Pittsburgh, Andy Kozar is a New York City based trumpeter, improviser, composer and educator that has been called a “star soloist” (TimeOutNY) and has been said to be “agile as he navigated leaps and slurs with grace . . . he shifted between lyricism and aggression de ly” (International Trumpet Guild Journal). A strong advocate of contemporary music, he is a founding member of the contemporary music quartet loadbang which has been called “inventive” (New York Times), “cultivated” (The New Yorker), and “a formidable new-music force” (TimeOutNY). With loadbang, his playing has been said to be “polished and dynamic, with very impressive playing” (the Baltimore Sun), and that he “coaxed the ethereal and the gritty from [his] muted instrument .. . . and revealed a facility for shaping notes and color” (San Francisco Classical Voice). He is also a member of TILT Brass and has performed with new music ensembles including Argento Chamber Ensemble, Talea Ensemble, Ensemble Signal, Ensemble ACJW, Wet Ink, and Mark Gould’s Pink Baby Monster.

Corrine Byrne

Hailed for her “beautiful vocal timbre,” soprano Corrine Byrne has quickly become a celebrated singer and interpreter of repertoire from the Medieval to the Baroque era, and music by today’s most daring contemporary composers. Recent roles include Anna I (Die Todsünden), Lady Madeline (The Fall of The House of Usher by Felix Jarrar), Doctor (The Scarlet Professor by Eric Sawyer), Cathy (The Last Five Years), Gretel (Hansel and Gretel) and Anima (Ordo Virtutum). Byrne has made appearances with The Lucerne Festival Academy Orchestra, REBEL Baroque Ensemble, One World Symphony, Manhattan School of Music Symphony Orchestra, Plymouth Philharmonic Orchestra, Amherst Symphony, Lorelei Ensemble, the Carnegie Hall Chamber Chorus, and is a co-founder of Ensemble Musica Humana. Byrne was a finalist for the 2012 Career Bridges Grant Awards, the 2013 Classical Singer Magazine Competition, the 2015 Handel Aria Competition, and a semi-finalist in the 2016 New York Oratorio Society Solo Competition. She holds a B.M. from UMass Amherst, an M.M. from Manhattan School of Music, and a D.M.A. from Stony Brook University.

John Popham

Cellist John Popham is a chamber musician and teacher based in Brooklyn, New York. His playing has been described as “brilliant” and “virtuosic” (Kronen Zeitung), “warm but variegated”, and “finely polished” (The New York Times).

Currently a member of Either/Or Ensemble and LONGLEASH, Mr. Popham has performed internationally with groups including Klangforum Wien, Talea Ensemble, and the Argento Chamber Ensemble. He has appeared as soloist with the Louisville Orchestra, the String Orchestra of Brooklyn, the Red Light Ensemble, and the Kunstuniversität Graz Chorus.

Recent festival appearances include Brücken (Austria), Open Musik (Austria), IMPULS (Austria), the Vermont Mozart Festival, USINESONORE (Switzerland), Bay Chamber (Maine), the Contemporary Classical Music Festival (Peru), Lucerne Festival, and Klangspuren (Austria).

Dedicated to new music performance, Mr. Popham has worked with composers including Pierre Boulez, Tristan Murail, Steve Reich, Nils Vigeland, and Reiko Füting. The recipient of a Fulbright research grant, Mr. Popham spent the 2013/2014 academic year in Austria, where he studied the performance practice of Klangforum Wien and worked with leading figures in contemporary Austrian music: Beat Furrer, Georg Friedrich Haas, Klaus Lang, and Pierluigi Billone.

Mr. Popham is currently cello faculty of the Extension Division of Rutgers University. He received his BM and MM from the Manhattan School of Music where he was a student of David Geber and David Soyer and was awarded the Manhattan School of Music Full Scholarship. He has recorded for Tzadik, Carrier, New Focus, Albany, and Arte Nova records.

Mivos String Quartet

The Mivos Quartet, “one of America’s most daring and ferocious new-music ensembles” (The Chicago Reader), is devoted to performing the works of contemporary composers, presenting new music to diverse audiences. Since the quartet's beginnings in 2008 they have performed works by emerging and established international composers who represent varied aesthetics of contemporary composition. Mivos is invested in commissioning and premiering new music for string quartet, particularly in a context of close collaboration with composers over extended time-periods. Recent collaborations include works with Mark Barden (Wien Modern Commission, Dan Blake (Jerome Commission), Richard Carrick (Fromm Commission), Patrick Higgins (ZS), Sam Pluta (Lucerne Festival Commission), Kate Soper, Saul Williams, Scott Wollschleger and Eric Wubbels (CMA commission). Mivos is committed to working with guest artists, exploring multi-media projects involving live video and electronics, creating original compositions and arrangements for the quartet, and performing improvised music. The quartet has appeared on concert series including Wien Modern (Austria), Transart (Italy), Music at the Phillips (Washington, DC), Lucerne Festival (Switzerland), HellHOT! New Music Festival (Hong Kong), Festival International Chihuahua (México), Edgefest (Ann Arbor, MI), Asphalt Festival (Germany), and Aldeburgh Music (UK).

18 Sep, 2017

Scott Wollschleger CD Release Event for "Soft Aberration" 10.20 at Metropolis Space

Composer Scott Wollschleger celebrates the release of his recording Soft Aberration with an event at the Metropolis Ensemble space at 1 Rivington Street 2nd Floor in New York on October 20th at 7:15pm. The Mivos Quartet will play Wollschleger's White Wall off the recording and pianist Karl Larson will perform solo works as well. CDs will be available for purchase as well as light snacks and …

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Reviews

Lunar Lodge

I am fascinated and disturbed by cognitive dissonance: the apparent disparity between appearance and reality. Today, we are all too often glued to some form of screen, telling us that things are different from what our eyes are telling us — that everything is okay, when it quite clearly isn’t — the Žižekian “I know very well, but…” “Relations of domination function through their denial,” Žižek writes, in his 2008 book In Defence of Lost Causes. “We are not only obliged to obey our masters, we are also obliged to act as if we were free and equal.” What I like about Wollschleger’s “Brontal Symphony” is that, at several points in its fourteen and a half minutes, the piece pulls the screen back so that the listener must face reality, face our own cognitive dissonance in all its horrible hilarity. -- 10.20.2017

The New Yorker

I first heard of the Brooklyn-based composer Scott Wollschleger thirteen years ago, when he was a student at the Manhattan School of Music. Back then he was writing ambitiously sprawling pieces, as students often do. He has since whittled down his aesthetic to something distinctive and magnetic, as his New Focus album “Soft Aberration” attests. On the atlas of new music, Wollschleger lands somewhere in the borderland between Minimalia and Feldmanistan: obsessive repetitions of stripped-down materials bring to mind minimalism, while spells of hushed, cryptic beauty recall the great American modernist Morton Feldman. Yet Wollschleger has found a territory very much his own. Particularly striking is his way of circling around a simple-seeming musical figure until it becomes something at once familiar and strange. He says in a program note that he embraces “the idea that we can create art that is very basic and human by discovering the sensation of an object.” The piano trio titled “Brontal Symmetry,” played by Longleash, exemplifies his aesthetic. It emerged from a collection of fragments left over from other projects. These circulate in an unpredictable, fitful sequence, as if a mechanism were disobeying its algorithm and developing a mind of its own. Cartoonish mischief comes into play: at 7:30, E-flat dominant-seventh chords crash in out of nowhere, like a bit of Romantic piano bombast gone astray. Somehow, these “discarded scraps,” as the composer calls them, gather into a potent narrative. It’s like a junk-metal mobile that achieves free-floating grace. — Alex Ross, 10.25.2017, The New Yorker

Avant Scena

“Soft Abarration” [sic] is the newest album released by “New Focus Records” on October 20. The compositions written by American contemporary classical music and academic avant-garde composer Scott Wollschleger [sic]. Scott Wollshleger is an American composer. He had bacema [sic] famous because of his original and extraordinary composing style, expressive and unusual sound, free and creative musical experiments. Scott’s Wollshleger’s composing style is based on experimental and unusual musical decisions – free form, modern structure, various types of harmonic chords, melodies and rhythms are masterfully combined together with extended playing techniques, wide range of musical expressions and other music elements. His music also is a synthesis between various modernism and academic avant-garde styles synthesis. Extravagant and stunning musical decisions, creative and colorful experiments, dramatic melodies, innovative instrumentation are the main elements of his composing style. The main part of his compositions are written for chamber ensembles, synphony [sic] orchestras or solo instruments. He can essentially connect together different music styles – experimental music, various jazz styles, world music elements are twisted together with academic avant-garde. The compositions of this album were recorded by various musicians and ensembles which are very famous in academic music scene – soprano Corrine Byrne, trumpeter Andy Kozar, violist Anne Lanzilotti, cellist John Popham, pianist Karl Larson, “Mivos Quartet” and “Longleash” trio. All musicians play these compositions very expressive and create unusual. [sic] creative, adventurous and versatile sound.

Album compositions are based on various contemporary music styles and their elements synthesis [sic]. The compositions for various chamber ensembles or solo players are recorded here – “Brontal Symmetry”, “Soft Aberration”, “Bring Something Incomprehensible into this World”, “America” and “String Quartet No.2 “White Wall”. The compositions have colorful and modern musical language – extraordinary and free form, polyphonic structure, variety of unusual timbres, essential combination of tonal and atonal music, serialism and various experimental composing techniques are the main elements of these compositions. Late expressionism, post-romantism and modernism styles are synthesized with academic avant-garde and experimental music. Various stunning and extravagant instrumentation decisions and dynamic harmony are heard very much in this album compositions [sic]. Dramatic strings solos, arepeggio, glissando, pizzicato, puantilism [sic] elements and other modern playing techniques are combined with innovative ways of playing. This wide range of extended playing techniques helps the composer to extract new and interesting sounds, get out from the traditional musical decisions and comfort zone of the instruments. Scott Wollschleger does all that very stunning and remarkable – with different musical expressions and playing techniques he create different – original, extravagant and stunning sound [sic]. The compositions are interesting not just because of form, structure or instrumentation. It also has many different moods and characters. Dramatic expression combines with tragical or depressive lyricism, joyful and playful episodes – with sad and solemn pieces. It’s very hard to predict what’s going to happen next – this music is full of sudden and spontaneous stylistic turns, musical languages changes and colorful instrumentation decisions. Sharp, agressive [sic] and provocative harmony is based on various unusual chords, which bring more dramatical [sic] and interesting sound to this album compositions. The rhythmic is very variable and dynamic – it gently fit [sic] together with melodic and harmonix [sic] elements and form a solid basement and background. All compositions of this album were played not just very precisely and professionally, but also expressive, energetic, emotional and original. The musicians revealed the main elements of Scott Wollshleger’s composing style and combined original, extraordinary and unique playing style and manner by each musician. Remarkable and innovative sound of this album is masterfulyl [sic] created with numerous of different playing techniques and other music elements. — Avant Scena, 10.25.2017

I Care if You Listen

New York based composer Scott Wollschleger describes his work, Soft Aberration, in the following manner: “Soft Aberration is a piece about imitation, but rather than sharing identical musical material, I imagined each instrument as a damaged reflective surface, which projects a kind of ‘broken echo’ between the two instruments. In some sense, the piano wants to ‘see itself’ in the viola’s music, and the viola wants the same from the piano. The two struggle with this throughout the piece, and at various times they find a way to ‘see’ each other.”

Included on the composer’s debut portrait recording, which bears the same title as the piece (released October 20, 2017 by New Focus Recordings), this captivating note seems compatible with the album as a complete unit, just as the title lays across the varying works and ties them together under the notion of objects and forms endeavoring to see their reflections within an imperfect mirror. In many ways, this is an album that feels like a single, expansive work, and yet it is a work in which each part also comes across as a whole, like exploring the reflection of the surrounding room in the complex surface of a cut and polished gemstone; each surface reveals a new perspective that cannot be experienced within the room itself, but only through its reflection.

The opening track, entitled Brontal Symmetry, was commissioned by New York based piano trio Longleash, made up of pianist Renate Rohlfing, violinist Pala Garcia, and cellist John Popham. The piece embodies an aspect of Wollschleger’s uniquely individual idiom that the composer describes as “creative repetition in form,” with subtle, driving undulations broken regularly by cascading bursts of activity that descend effervescently before settling again into a churning swamp of low tones from the piano, metallic sighs from the cello, and delicate ricochets from the violin.

Indeed, many of the works on the album vacillate between expansive nebulas probing the composer’s interest in “conceptualizing silence” and lucid periods of mechanistic, rhythmic repetition that invoke a suggestion of self awareness, as though wandering particles of distinct and inherent quality have suddenly coalesced into some new, aggregate form; an organism that has spontaneously emerged from swirling and chaotic silence and realized it can walk or swim or fly through the air, but does so only to explore the revelation of locomotion, without yet having grasped the power it wields to direct its course through the ether. In describing Brontal Symmetry, Anne Lanzilotti may be indirectly referring to this apparent invocation when she suggests the piece is founded upon the “idea that we can create art that is very basic and human by discovering the sensation of an object.”

The album’s title track, Soft Abberation, commissioned and performed by pianist Karl Larson and violist Anne Lanzilotti, hovers more consistently over that plane of formlessness on the verge of taking flight while (as described above) each instrument struggles to see itself in the other.

Bring Something Incomprehensible into This World is a rather fascinating piece for trumpet and voice, commissioned and performed by soprano Corrine Byrne and trumpeter Andy Kozar. Divided into three parts and spread across the remainder of the album, the work showcases Wollschleger’s knack for weaving luscious tapestries out of overlapping timbres within simple and delicate cells of material. The piece exhibits this process on a number of layers, making interchangeable the qualities of language and abstract sound, establishing new, conceptual instruments by combining these contrasting qualities in various ways (occasionally converging in what the composer describes as “dirty unisons”) and through the frequent interjection of space and silence.

As with the other works on the album, this piece represents in many ways both a part and the whole, a sort of musical synecdoche crafted not in concept but by the sounds themselves. This is explained poetically by the epigrammatic, eponymous text, which summarizes Wollschleger’s views on the purpose of art as the “rendering [of] something into existence that is inconceivable before it happens.”

America for solo cello, commissioned and performed by Longleash’s John Popham is a textural work that “reflects upon the desolation of the country.” Anne Lanzilotti compares the piece to another work by conceptual artist Glenn Ligon, called Double America 2, which she encountered at The Broad in Los Angeles. Like Ligon’s sculpture, a neon sign of the word AMERICA with its inversion underneath it, the piece suggests the limitless complexity of meaning and depth that is often overlooked in the idealization of a whole. In Ligon’s piece, the inverted AMERICA flickers unsettlingly, implying a less wholesome foundation than the clean, outstanding, right-side-up AMERICA suggests. Wollschleger’s composition draws out of the solo cello a symphony of sounds, textures and spectral sonorities, similarly alternating between warm solidity and fragile, hostile instability, impossible to summarize in a single sound or gesture.

Finally, White Wall, a two part string quartet commissioned and performed spectacularly by the Mivos Quartet, emerges from whispers and breathy murmurs at first conjuring spirits of Lachenmann and Feldman, before Wollschleger’s distinctive, pulmonary rhythms erect structures around them, echoing the ebb and flow of the preceding works but in an altogether unique space; another beam broken apart by Wollschelger’s prism, the emergence of form out of the white noise to which the title alludes.

In Wollschelger’s work it seems the listener is fully integrated into the creative process. There is no illusion, no curtain to pull aside or opaque, structural tropes to decode that are propped up by dense and overly articulated program notes. Nonetheless, the potential for ever increasing meaning feels limitless. Wollschelger’s stark honesty is approachable but deceptively simple and possessed of many, immeasurable (and some undetectable) dimensions. Rather than falling from above and condescending from some pedestal of intellectual vanity, these magical works rise holistically out of a more primal space and carry the listener with them as their petals unfurl and their flowers bloom over the dark, reflective pool of Wollschleger’s deeply profound imagination. — Christian Kriegeskotte, 10.27.2017, I Care if You Listen

AllMusic

The music of American composer Scott Wollschleger is undergirded by philosophical ideas, including those of the fearsome French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. Deleuze, in fact, provided the basis for Wollschleger's coined genre designation Brontal, which denotes, in the composer's words, "the idea that we can create art that is very basic and human by discovering the sensation of an object." Indeed, Wollschleger's music is accessible and compelling without reference to the philosophical substructure. The composer seems to be trying to present the sounds of instruments (conventional, not electronic) and voices in their most basic possible ways. Sample the first movement of Bring Something Incomprehensible into the World, based on and in part setting words of Deleuze. It's not clear why this work is broken up into three separated sections, especially inasmuch as they are indicated as to be played without a break in published form. But the opening movement, for voice and trumpet overlapping, is fascinating; there is little really extended technique for either singer or trumpeter, but the timbres are unique. The pieces are played by top-notch New York contemporary musicians who can realize Wollschleger's ideas. Wollschleger has described himself as "following lightly in the footsteps of the New York School," and for those curious about the contemporary ramifications of that group of composers, this is enthusiastically recommended. — James Manheim, AllMusic, 11.2017

Avant Music News

Composer Scott Wollschleger (b. 1980) seems most interested in creating musical effects through a deliberately-chosen economy of means. He writes largely for chamber ensembles or soloist performers, and in fact Soft Aberration, the first album dedicated to his work alone, contains compositions for solo, duo, trio and quartet.

A couple of the titles of these works—Soft Aberration, Brontal Symmetry—are likely to call up associations with New York School composers, especially Morton Feldman. Wollschleger has acknowledged the New York School and Feldman as influences and exemplary figures; like Feldman, Wollschleger favors constructing pieces out of repeating fragments of pitches, timbres, or rhythmic figures. His method for building a full-scale work out of these basic elements generally consists of creating chains of semi-independent events or moments defined by a relatively simple pattern of pitch, color, or rhythmic relationships. One moment doesn’t necessarily implicate the next; Wollschleger’s stated aim in making continuous works from discontinuous, repeating events is to encourage the listener to reflect on the sounds’ different facets–as if they had been presented from different angles.

The long piece that opens the album, 2015’s Brontal Symmetry, was commissioned by the unorthodox piano trio Longleash, who perform it here; the work is an astutely-chosen opener, as it epitomizes some of the key aspects of Wollschleger’s aesthetic. The piece lays out its fundamental musical material from the start, as it begins with a staccato, deliberately square-rhythmed three-note motif on the piano. The motif is picked up on the strings, which reproduce its phrase profile more than its exact melody; the playing then dissolves into a simulacrum of chaos—of acoustic white noise carried on the frenzied bowing of the strings. This contrast of moods sets a larger, symmetrical pattern in which the piece alternates passages defined by the simple motif with chaotic or quiet passages.

The white noise of the strings’ unpitched moments in Brontal Symmetry is developed further in —and alluded to in the title of–White Wall (2013) for string quartet. Played with the requisite subtlety by the Mivos Quartet, White Wall’s softly bowed, muted strings and whistling harmonics—broken on occasion by plucked or bowed stabs–largely exist in an audio environment notable for its low dynamics and dispersed texture. White Wall is a piece of extraordinary sonic delicacy that serves as the understated focus of the album.

The album’s other compositions—the title track, for piano and viola; America, for solo cello; and Bring Something Incomprehensible into This World, for the unusual duo of soprano and trumpet—give more evidence of a composer who can extract the expressive maximum from minimal musical means.

— Daniel Barbiero, Avant Music News, 11.13.2017

An Earful

Scott Wollschleger - Soft Aberration This debut album of angular chamber music showcases a composer so steeped in the European avant garde that neither Schoenberg, Berio or Boulez would have trouble connecting to what he’s doing here. But it’s rare that you hear such command of structure and orchestration in any idiom. Some of that may be a result of the fact that each piece was commissioned by its performer(s) and conceived with their specific talents in kind. The first piece, Brontal Symmetry, has wit, melody, and plenty of spice, doled out in digestible bits. Created from scraps unused in earlier works, it’s an ideal introduction to Wollschleger’s talents. The recording by Longleash, a trio comprised of Pala Garcia (violin), John Popham (cello), Renate Rohlfing (piano), sets a very high bar with their commitment and surprisingly light touch.

Popham is also heard in the threnodic America for solo cello, which he dispatches as though the ink were drying on the score. But with the great pianist Karl Larson on board with violinist Anne Lanzilotti in the title piece, and the Mivos Quartet closing the album with the spectral White Wall, there was never going to be any let up in quality. Wollschleger’s astonishing grasp is further demonstrated by perhaps the most challenging piece here, Bring Something Incomprehensible Into The World, a three movement work for soprano (Corinne Byrne) and trumpet (Andy Kozar). With both musicians pursuing extended techniques with style and even levity, it more than lives up to its title, and wonderfully so. Far from an aberration, this album is the sound of someone firmly planting their flag at a thrilling elevation. More, please. P.S. Keep an eye on upcoming performances of Wollschleger's music, including Larson in the complete piano music on November 20th. — Jeremy Shatan, An Earful, 10.28.2017

New Music Buff

The cover and the booklet that come with this CD contain art that is a remarkably fitting metaphor for the music contained herein. The almost monochromatic images with sometimes barely visible lines defining a space which requires serious concentration to discern effectively at times is very much like the music we hear on the disc.

Scott Wollschleger (1980- ) is an American composer who studied with Nils Vigeland at the Manhattan School of Music. His work has been compared to that of Morton Feldman and, more generally, to the other members of the so-called New York School. Vigeland has been active throughout his career performing and recording definitive versions of some of the best of Morton Feldman, John Cage, Earle Brown, and Christian Wolff. It would appear that these voices and stylistic leanings are very much favored at the Manhattan School of Music. A previous disc reviewed here with music by head of the composition department Reiko Futing, evokes a similar sound world.

This disc of chamber music contains five works on eight tracks ranging from 1’43” to 14’27” and all require almost as much concentration on the part of the listener as the extended techniques and performance requirements demand of the performers. The dynamic range is from (generous) silences to forte.

The first track is by the seriously entertaining and odd piano trio called Longleash. They demonstrate their expertise and concentration as well as their love for this musical genre in their performance of Brontal Symmetry (2015). Unlike the other pieces here, Brontal Symmetry makes use of ostinati and there is a consistent sound field punctuated with silences. It is an unusual but ultimately engaging piece. Longleash consists of Pala Garcia, violin; John Popham, cello; and Renate Rohlfing, piano.

It is followed by the titular and sparse Soft Aberration (2013) for viola and piano played by Anne Lanzilotti, viola and Karl Larson, piano. Though approximately the same length as the opening work the silences nearly suspend the perception of time and create a sense of sounds suspended in space in a sort of sculptural way.

Bring Something Incomprehensible into this World (2015) is for trumpet and soprano. The three parts of this work are spread across the disc (tracks 3, 5, and 8) creating an even more spare sense. It is interesting to play the three movements manually without the interruption of the intended track sequence to get a sense of the piece. Again we have silences predominating with extended techniques demanded of the performers. Andy Kozar plays trumpet and the soprano is Corrine Byrne. The first movement at 6’39” is the longest followed by the second at 3’25” and the last at 1’43”.

America (2013) is a solo cello piece here played by John Popham (of Longleash). It is a pointillistic mix of silence and extended instrumental techniques which makes reference to an art work by Glenn Ligon.

White Wall (2013) is for string quartet and is played by the Mivos Quartet consisting of Olivia De Prato, violin; Josh Modney, violin; Victor Lowrie, viola; and Mariel Roberts, cello. This is an amalgam of unfolding processes which seem to be indiosyncratic to the composer. It is very intimate music in that sense. The piece is in two substantial movements.

The album concludes with the brief last part of Bring Something Incomprehensible Into This World. Suffice it to say that there are attempts here to tie in philosophical as well as visual metaphors. Wollschleger is apparently enamored of the writings of Deleuze, Nietzsche, and Brecht. Her lies another tie in to the New York School with their love of visual metaphors and philosophy. This is not an easy listen but it is a serious effort deserving of some attention. The listener can decide whether the artists have indeed brought something comprehensible into this world…or not. — Allan Cronin, New Music Buff, 11.15.2017

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