Nomi Epstein: sounds

, composer

About

Composer and artistic director of Chicago based experimental ensemble a.pe.ri.od.ic, Nomi Epstein releases "sounds," a compilation of her own works for ensemble and solo piano. Epstein's sensitive attention to timbre, phrase syntax, pitch, and silence invites the listener inside a sonic world that is rich in expression and poignant contemplation.

Audio

Nomi Epstein’s work exists beneath the superficial expressive armor that dictates much of our communication, musically and otherwise. She writes music that is fragile and penetrating, demanding that the listener release our collective fixation on mental quickness and information density and sit still, sometimes uncomfortably so, with sound, phrase, and silence. On this portrait release of her music, “sounds,” we are given the opportunity to hear these artistic convictions through the lens of her piano music as it contrasts with two experimental ensemble works.

The album opens with Till for solo piano, a solo piano work performed by Reinier van Houdt (who also performs the other two solo works). Feldman’s presence is felt in subtle syntactic changes over phrase repetitions. But Epstein is not bound by any preconceived process, freely venturing away from an established phrase structure for a poignant tolling dyad. After only ninety seconds, the work gets “stuck” on a six note ascending arpeggio figure for nearly three minutes, reveling in repetitions in which variable accents are the only changing parameter. If Feldman’s orders and reorders notes like words in a Gertrude Stein text, Epstein draws attention to how our perception of the same ordering shifts depending on emphasis. The subsequent section explores a similar phenomenon, now mapped onto accented dyads that occur at variable intervals over a steady pulse. Till closes with a series of slow repetitions of one unsettling chord, basking in the complex resonance it leaves in its wake.

for Collect/Project explores a different side of Epstein’s work, albeit one that is very much focused on sound and silence. Scored for voice, bass flute, and live electronics, Epstein creates small sound sculptures from the hybrid timbres emerging from the three performers. Opening with croaking and fluttering vocal techniques, the listener is immediately brought inside the direct tactility of sound in a way that makes the piano sound like a tool of sonic abstraction. Sustained tones and descending glissandi form composite sounds that blend the brittleness of the voice, the warmth of the flute, and the coolness of the electronics. Electronic white noise washes over the texture midway through, obscuring texts as the flute merges into the texture with its own air techniques. Flute and voice alternate fifths that slowly compress before a series of overlapping figures oscillating at different rates to close the work.

The two part Solo for Piano is a study in contrast, from the rumbling low register gestures of “Waves,” to the patient unfolding of sonorities in “Dyads.” The waves of the title in the first part are generated by the two hands playing close together on the bass end of the keyboard in a “continuously changing rhythmic gesture.” After each phrase crests, the murky resonance hangs in the air, before a new phrase washes over once again. “Dyads” contains a series of over-ringing two note chords, registrally separated but rhythmically regular. The seventeen minute work is hypnotic but not static, possessing a compelling level of variety within its self-imposed restrictions.

sounds for Jeff and Eliza for flute, bass clarinet, and piano (with Epstein at the keyboard) returns to the world of exquisite sound objects heard in for Collect/Object. The absence of electronics and the focus on multiphonic sonorities lends this work a more austere tone. The microscopic focus on the interaction between the three instruments makes each entrance consequential — does the piano enter first and the winds join its resonance, or are they separated to momentarily disentangle their sonorities? The sparseness of rhythmic and gestural contrast is balanced by the complexity of each composite gesture.

“sounds” concludes with another solo piano work, Layers for Piano. The piece shares the suspended, ethereal quality of “Dyads,” but features a three layered notational construction. The top layer, a single note floating melodic line, is the only layer that is metered, written with specific note values and rests. The other two layers are notated spatially -- their rhythmic organization is meant to be placed around the top melodic layer. The second layer contains single staccato notes that shadow the melody, written as quarter notes on specific pitches, and the third layer contains watery chord clusters, notated as gestures which indicate register and interval span but not precise pitch. As the piece unfolds, the clusters migrate around the register of the piano and become more variable rhythmically and with respect to articulation. Throughout, Epstein’s compositional focus seems to be as directed towards the rich resonance vibrating inside the piano as to each newly introduced pitch.

The music on this collection is uncompromising, not in its impenetrability but in its refusal to pander. While the sound of van Houdt’s piano defines the world of this recording, the two ensemble works confirm Epstein’s focus, albeit from varied directions. Epstein’s expressive world insists on quieting the mind and opening up to subtleties of sonic detail. A listener’s willingness to forego an expectation to be entertained by extroverted sound is duly rewarded by the sublime experience of her poetic compositions.

- Dan Lippel

Tracks 1, 3, 4, 6: Recorded July 17, 2019 Nicolas Lefèvre, engineer; Sunny Side Inc., Brussels

Track 2: Live concert recording October 9, 2016 Grayson Elliott Taylor, engineer; Claudia Cassidy Theater, Chicago

Track 5: Recorded February 21, 2019 Nick Broste, engineer; The Shape Shoppe, Chicago

Liner Notes: Jennie Gottschalk

Cover Photo: Nomi Epstein

Graphic Design: Juli Sherry

Producer: Nomi Epstein

Editing/Mixing/Mastering: Alex Inglizian, Experimental Sound Studio, Chicago

Nomi Epstein

Nomi Epstein, D.M.A, is an active composer, curator/performer, and music educator. Her works have been performed at Ostrava Days, Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, Darmstadt, Bang on a Can, and Akademie Schloss Solitude, and she was twice invited as an Artist-in-Residence at the Atlantic Center for the Arts. Epstein is the recipient of four CAP grants, and was featured in the Chicago Tribune for her work as a composer, curator, teacher, and performer. Contributing works to Australian flutist Janet McKay’s 2009 US tour “Those Vanished Hands,” guitarist Aaron Larget-Caplan’s “New Lullaby Project” and percussionist Joe Bergen’s new vibraphone collection “For Semy,” her compositions have been performed throughout the US and Europe by such artists as ICE, Ensemble SurPlus, Mivos Quartet, Wet Ink, Dal Niente, Seth Josel, and Eliza Garth.

In 2012, Epstein produced/curated a 5-concert John Cage centennial festival in Chicago, and was invited to present at the Northwestern University Cage Symposium and serve as composer-in-residence at the Florida State University Cage Festival. She is founder/ curator of the critically acclaimed, Chicago-based experimental music concert series “a.pe.ri.od.ic.” She continues to perform experimental music with a.pe.ri.od.ic, and NbN (her improvisation trio, in residence at High Concept Laboratories in 2012).

As an educator, she has served on the faculties of the University of Illinois at Chicago, Northwestern, and Roosevelt Universities. She is currently head of theory at the British School and instructor of theory, composition and aural skills at DePaul. Epstein holds degrees from Columbia University, New England Conservatory, and Northwestern University where her principal teachers included Fred Lerdahl, Michael Gandolfi, Marti Epstein, Amy Williams, Jay Alan Yim, and Augusta Read Thomas.

http://www.nomiepstein.com/

Reinier van Houdt

Reinier van Houdt started working with tape recorders, radios, objects and various string-instruments at a young age. He studied piano at the Liszt-Akademie in Budapest & the Royal Conservatory in The Hague. He developed a fascination for matters that escape notation: sound, timing, space, physicality, memory, noise, environment - points beyond composition, interpretation and improvisation.

He has built himself an unusual repertoire that consistently resulted from personal quests; from collaborations with composers & musicians, from research in archives, from the composing and staging of music-performances or from unorthodox studies of classical music, and from endless tape recordings he made since the eighties.

Aside from his own music he premiered music by Robert Ashley, Alvin Curran, Kaikhosru Sorabji, Francisco López, Christian Marclay, Charlemagne Palestine, Yannis Kyriakides, Maria de Alvear, Jerry Hunt, Michael Pisaro, Walter Marchetti, Jürg Frey, Nomi Epstein. He has also worked with Annea Lockwood, John Cage, Alvin Lucier, Luc Ferrari, Peter Ablinger.

Reinier van Houdt plays in David Tibet's Current 93, where he worked Nick Cave, John Zorn, Anohni, Jack Barnett. He is also one of the moving forces behind the experimental music collective MAZE.

He performed in such diverse venues as The Roulette & the Issue Project Room in New York, Colegio Ildefonso Mexico City, Café Oto & Queen Elizabeth Hall in London, DOM in Moscow, Setagaya Gallery Tokyo, Paradiso Amsterdam, Apollohuis Eindhoven, the New Library in Alexandria Egypt, REDCAT & the Wulf in Los Angeles, Mills College Oakland, Non Event Boston, Kuryokhin Center in St Petersburg, Trafo Budapest, Nuits Nomadiques in Paris, Brut in Wien, HAU and Volksbühne in Berlin, Empty Gallery Hong Kong, Tramway Glasgow and Klangraum Düsseldorf. Appearances in festivals CTM Berlin, Meltdown London, Angelica Bologna, Holland Festival, Warsaw Autumn, Incubate Tilburg, UNSOUND Poland, Primavera Barcelona, November Music Den Bosch, and many others.

He won an award at Ars Electronica Linz 2012 with Francisco López, the Prix Europe 2015 with the Andcompany&Co and the first prize at Videoex 2019 with filmmaker Takashi Makino.

Frauke Aulbert

“Hamburg’s queen of avantgarde” (Hamburger Abendblatt Jan. 2010) Frauke Aulbert is one of the most active and multi-talented vocalists in the field of contemporary music today. Her almost infinite, impressive vocal sound palette enfolds a nearly four octave range next to classical singing (diploma), over- and undertone-singing, multiphonics, techniques from Bulgarian folclore, Korean gugak, gamelan, jazz, dhrupad, beatboxing a.s.o.

Concerts led her to festivals all over the world: Witten Days for New Chamber Music, Casa Giacinto Scelsi Rome, Radio France/Festival Présence, ZKM, Elbphilharmonie Hamburg, Onassis Centre Athens, Internationale Darmstädter Ferienkurse, Warsaw Autumn, LIG Art Hall Seoul, Resonant Bodies New York, Deutsche Oper Berlin, Ear Taxi Chicago, Sommerliche Musiktage Hitzacker, International Stockhausen-Summerclasses, Hamburger Klangwerktage, Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Klang Copenhaguen, What’s next Brussels, Berghain and Klangwerkstatt Berlin and many more, to Brasil, the USA, Australia, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Tunisia, Georgia and South-Korea.

Frauke Aulbert was awarded various prizes and grants, a.o. the first price by the Stockhausen-foundation, as well as artist residencies in Rome (Goethe Institut), Paris (Cité Internationale des Arts) and Stuttgart (Akademie Schloss Solitude) in 2016/17, where she is currently working on her project ‘Beatboxing and the Avant Garde’.

Frauke Aulbert has collaborated with composers such as Georges Aperghis, Vinko Globokar, Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf, Hans-Joachim Hespos, Simon Stockhausen, Brigitta Muntendorf, Heera Kim, Michael Maierhof, Geoffroy Drouin and Alexander Schubert. She has been recording for film ('The Future', Miranda July), CD (Decoder Ensemble, Magic Malik etc.) and radio (Deutschlandradio, RAI, Radio France etc.)

Frauke Aulbert is founding member and artistic (co)director of her groups Collect/Project (Hamburg-Chicago), Decoder Ensemble (Hamburg) and Forum Neue Vokalmusik (Hannover). She studied in Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain, and in Kiel and Hamburg, Germany. Her diploma thesis examined ‘Overtone singing in Contemporary Music’.

Shanna Gutierrez

Flutist Shanna Pranaitis fearlessly expands the realm of sonic possibility for her instruments through innovative performances and educational projects, in which she integrates new and historically reimagined works with multi-disciplinary elements to create seamless, immersive concert experiences. She is interested in exploring ways to engage and involve a wider community in the process of

experiencing music. An important part of this work is the close cooperation with living composers, poets, movement artists, and other interdisciplinary artists, around the world on the development of new work. Shanna travels the world regularly to perform and teach as a solo guest artist and with the chamber ensembles Memoria Nova (Andrew Rosenblum, piano) and Collect/Project. She has performed and taught as a guest artist in Germany, Portugal, Switzerland, The Netherlands, South Korea, Mexico, Colombia, and the United Kingdom. In 2017, she co-curated and co-organized the first multi-day festival of Galina Ustvolskaya’s music in the United States. She is the co-founder of FluteXpansions, the first comprehensive e-learning platform and laboratory for composers and performers to explore contemporary flute music and techniques. he most recent recording includes a disc of Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf’s works for flute on NEOS (summer 2020). She performs on a Burkart flute and piccolo and Kingma bass and alto flutes.

Francisco Castillo Trigueros

Francisco Castillo Trigueros (b. 1983) is a composer of contemporary chamber, orchestral and electronic music from Mexico City. He has received numerous distinctions such as the Jury 1st prize at the Edes Prize, NEM Young Composers International Forum, the BMI Student Composer Award, honorable mentions in the 2010 and 2011 Morton Gould Young Composer Awards, and four nominations for the Gaudeamus Prize in The Netherlands.

Castillo Trigueros has worked extensively with intercultural ensembles. His intercultural work draws from his multi-cultural raising in Mexico, and deals with issues of identity, diversity, and hybridity. It presents diversity while creating unity. In his work Prisma, for oboe, 6 East Asian instruments, and strings, the distinctive eastern and western sound worlds are blended together to create a unified fluid timbre.

Francisco has also composed numerous pieces for traditional music ensembles and orchestras, often including the use of electronics. His pieces are often inspired by visual art. His work Nealika, which he wrote in 2009-10 for eighth blackbird, is inspired by the fluid symmetry and colorful patterns found in Huichol visual art. His work Emblema | Blau for flute, string quartet, and percussion, is structured using one of the most emblematic figures in Mexican culture: the pyramid.

Francisco's recent collaboration with biochemist Josiah Zayner on The Chromochord, an instrument that allows the sonification of nano-sized light-responsive proteins found in plants, has been featured in several publications including Scientific American.

Orchestras, ensembles and performers that have performed his music include the Holland Symfonia, Orchestre National de Lorraine, Chicago Composers Orchestra, eighth blackbird, ensemble dal niente, Atlas Ensemble, Nieuw Ensemble, Asko Ensemble, Pacifica String Quartet, Spektral String Quartet, Fonema Consort, Jason Alder, Brian Conelly, Ryan Muncy, and Shanna Gutierrez.

His mentors and teachers include Augusta Read Thomas, Shulamit Ran, Kotoka Susuki, Howard Sandroff at the University of Chicago; Theo Loevendie, Richard Ayres, Fabio Nieder at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam; Shih-Hui Chen, Kurt Stallman, Pierre Jalbert at Rice University; and Haruko Shimizu and Jose Tavarez in Mexico City.

Castillo Trigueros recently obtained a Ph.D at the University of Chicago, where he served as Computer Music Studio Manager for three years.

Eliza Bangert

Flutist Eliza Bangert is in demand throughout the Midwest as an orchestral player, chamber musician, and new music interpreter. She has been a substitute with the Grant Park Symphony and with the Chicago Symphony, where her engagements have included subscription concerts, the MusicNOW series, and concerts at Ravinia. She has performed in the pit and in the stage band for Lyric Opera and Lyric Opera Unlimited, and in the pit at Chicago Opera Theater. She performs regularly with the Illinois Philharmonic, is a performing member of the Chicago Philharmonic, and in 2017 won the second flute audition with the South Bend Symphony. Since 2011, she has held the Third Flute/Piccolo chair with the Southwest Michigan Symphony Orchestra.

Since 2012, Eliza has been a core member of the experimental music ensemble a.pe.ri.od.ic, which recently gave the American premiere of Tim Parkinson’s opera Time With People following a Fall 2016 residency at High Concept Labs. She has also appeared with the International Chamber Artists, Fonema Consort, Palomar, and Ensemble Dal Niente. In 2014, together with flutist Dalia Chin and mezzo-soprano Kate McDuffie, she commissioned new chamber works from Monte Weber, Scott Scharf, and D. Edward Davis. This project, called “in the same breath,” toured to the Florida Flute Fair and the Omaha Under the Radar festival.

Eliza holds degrees in flute performance from DePaul University and the University of Northern Iowa, where her principal teachers included Mary Stolper, Angeleita Floyd, and Torleif Ander. She particularly enjoys playing piccolo, and has coached extensively with the CSO’s Jennifer Gunn.

In addition to her performing life, Eliza is an orchestra librarian for the Grant Park Symphony and AWR Music, where she enjoys the opportunity to organize and alphabetize everything in sight.

http://elizabangert.com/

Jeff Kimmel

Jeff Kimmel is a Chicago-based clarinetist whose work encompasses improvisation, new and experimental music, and interdisciplinary collaborations.

Jeff is the clarinetist of the experimental music ensemble a.pe.ri.od.ic, and has performed at the Chicago Cultural Center, Harris Theater, and Logan Center for the Arts. He is a regular contributor to Chicago’s improvised music community, collaborates with Andrew Tham as part of the multimedia concern Current Conditions, and has toured with puppet theatre company Manual Cinema.

Jeff’s work has been funded by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs, and he was awarded a residency at the Atlantic Center for the Arts to work with Roscoe Mitchell. Originally from Greenville, SC, Jeff holds a B.M. from New England Conservatory of Music.

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